frequently asked questions

DO I NEED A REFERRAL TO SEE A DIETITIAN

No. Some background information is very helpful though, e.g. recent blood results and other test results and diagnoses. This way, I get a very good picture of your current health status so that we can better understand your dietary needs when helping you manage your health goals.

 

WHAT IS AN APD (Accredited Practising Dietitian)?

An Accredited Practising Dietitian is a professional recognized to possess the qualifications and skills required to offer expert advice in nutrtion and diet. These professionals are well-educated in food and health, and their knowledge will be indispensible in sorting through the plethora of nutrition information that exists.

 

APDs are qualified to provide advice to both individuals and groups on any subject related to nutrition; they are also required to undergo clinical training in the treatment of conditions like diabetes, heart disease, cancers, gastro-intestinal diseases, food allergies and intolerances, and obesity through dietary modifications.

 

APDs’ university qualifications are accredited by the DAA (Dietitians Association of Australia); they constantly further their training and education to comply with the Association’s practice regulations. They adhere to the DAA Code of Professional Conduct and Statement of Ethical Practice, and are committed to offering only the highest level of service.

 

The only national credential recognised by the Australian Government, Medicare, the Department of Veterans Affairs and most private health funds as the standard for nutrition and dietetics services, the APD is a recognised trademark protected by law.

WHAT DO APDs DO?

APDs exist to give scientific nutrition information practical application in patients’ lives, and assess nutritional needs in order to develop personalised eating plans and nutritional guidelines.

 

APDs provide information on:

  • Healthy Eating

  • Reading food labels

  • Using discretion when shopping/eating out

  • Preparing food in healthier ways

 

They also:

  • Illuminate nutrition myths

  • Undertake research in the field of nutrition

  • Train health care professionals

  • Develop nutrition communications, programs and policies

 

APDs put their skills and knowledge to use in a range of work environments, including care facilities, community nutrition and public health, consultancy and private practice, food service, public relations, marketing and communications, government, research, and teaching.

 

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ACCREDITED PRACTICING DIETITIAN AND A NUTRITIONIST?

Technically, there are no guidelines in place to govern the use of the terms “dietitian” and “nutritionist”; they may be used by accredited dietitians, nutrition scientists, and nutrition graduates and underqualified nutrition professionals alike. Always ensure that you are receiving the highest level of expert nutrition advice by inquiring about the qualifications of a dietitian or nutritionist and their APD credential.

WHAT IS A DIABETES EDUCATOR?

Health care professionals with particular experience in diabetes education and care are known as diabetes educators. Their responsibility is to assist people with diabetes, those at risk for the condition, and their caretakers in gaining the knowledge, skill set, and confidence to manage the condition and make educated decisions about their treatment.

Diabetes educators combine clinical care with providing a comprehensive diabetes education.

Working in environments like hospitals, physician’s rooms, general practitioners’ surgeries, and private practices, diabetes educators help people cope with diabetes and set goals for establishing self-management practices for the condition.

 

Sydney Health Diabetes Educators are those who have completed the appropriate accredited university course for Diabetes Education and Management at the University of Technology, Sydney.

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